The Moedim

Temporary Tents

Summer is almost here and many are looking forward, no doubt, to a time of camping out in tents, in other words, in a sukkah!

Leviticus 23:43 – “You will dwell in sukkot seven days; all native-born Israelites will live in sukkot so that generation after generation will know that Yahweh made the children of Israel live in sukkot when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I am Yahweh your God.”

The word, Sukkot [סֻכּוֹת H5523] means a booth – a basic, crude, or temporary shelter, a tent. Did the Hebrew slaves coming out of Egypt simply decide to erect temporary tents to sleep in every night? Not according to the Leviticus scriptures! They dwelt in sukkot (booths) because Yahweh made them do so. So, we must ask, “Is the Sukkot moed just about sleeping in booths during the Exodus?” And to this we must reply, “Perhaps not. Perhaps Sukkot commemorates where they camped, not what they slept in. Perhaps Sukkot honors what Yahweh did, not so much what the Hebrews did!

Why Call it Sukkot
Exodus 12:37 – “The Israelites journeyed from Ra‘amses to Sukkot.”
Numbers 33:5 – “The Israelites left Ra’amses and camped at Sukkot.”

Note the key words, “camped at sukkot” The Hebrews left Ra’amses and then camped at a place called Sukkot the very first night! Perhaps this town got called “shanty town” because of the many booths they built. If so, this would not be the first time that a place or town got called Sukkot.

Genesis 33:17 tells us that Jacob also built a booth and called the place Sukkot: “Jacob journeyed to Sukkot, built himself a house, and made booths for his cattle: therefore the name of the place is called Sukkot”. Jonah 4:5 tells us that Jonah also built a booth to sleep in: “So Jonah went out of the city, and sat on the east side of the city, and there made him a sukkot, and sat under it in the shadow, till he might see what would become of the city”. 2 Samuel 11:11 tells us that the soldiers on campaign slept in sukkot: “Uriah said to David, ‘The ark and Israel and Judah dwell in sukkot.”   And a day is coming when Yahweh will once again raise the sukkah of David (Amos 9:11).

Provision
Exodus 13:21-22 – “Yahweh went before them by day in a pillar of cloud, to lead them on their way, and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light, that they might go by day and by night: the pillar of cloud by day, and the pillar of fire by night, didn’t depart from before the people.”

The Hebrew people had spent 430 years in Egypt. In Egypt they had real houses, real roofs, reliable shelters. They had fish, cucumbers, melons, leeks, onions, and garlic! They had bread made with leaven. But then, in an instant, they were taken out of their security and placed in booths out in the desert at a place called Sukkot, and all they had to eat was unleavened bread, matzo!

The Hebrews were only able to provide sukkot, tents, or booths, to sleep in. They had no protection from enemies. So Yahweh provided protection for them. The cloud by day, and the fire by night. The choice to leave Egypt was a huge leap of faith. Now, the Hebrews had to rely on Yahweh to provide all of their needs of food and shelter. This is the earth shattering event that Sukkot celebrates – faith in Yahweh.

Comparisons
The Pesach and Sukkot moedim are six months apart. The 15th of Tishri is exactly six months after the 15th of Nisan, the start of the Chag Ha’Matzoh moed. The seven days of Sukkot is as far away from the seven days of Pesach as one can get. The difference: Pesach celebrates what the Hebrews ate whereas Sukkot celebrates where the Hebrews slept. Both honor Yahweh’s provision.

Pesach represents being as close, experientially, to Yahweh’s protection and provision as one can get. Spring is when the seeds are planted. It is at this time that one must place complete trust in Yahweh to bring the seeds to a harvest. Sukkot, however, represents being as far away, experientially, from security and provision as one can get. Fall is when the harvest has been gathered, and the barns are full of grains, etc. It is at this time that one feels the most self-sufficient, but Sukkot reminds us that we are not self-sufficient, that all of our provision truly comes from Yahweh. And Yahweh remembers this event, saying: “I remember for you the kindness of your youth, the love of your weddings; how you went after me in the wilderness, in a land that was not sown” (Jeremiah 2:2).

Conclusions
Sukkot represents our need, Pesach represents Yahweh’s care. Sukkot calls for us to leave our home and trust Yahweh when we least feel we need to. Pesach calls for us to wholly accept that provision, even when our homes are well stocked, safe, and secure. Real security always comes from Yahweh. Sukkot is about the gift of faith and love that we give Yahweh, and the gift of love and care that he gives us in return.

Final Thought
The great day of Yahweh is getting really near, even at the door. It hastens forth and will not delay. We do NOT set dates, but clearly Yahweh is getting ready to change the course of human history once again. The signs are clear for those who have eyes to see and ears to hear.

The Moedim

Chanukah

John 10:22-23 – “It was winter, and Yeshua was in Jerusalem at the time of the Festival of Dedication, and he was walking in the Portico of Solomon inside the Temple.

Chanukah (sometimes spelled Hanukah or Chanukkah) is celebrated each fall, generally between Thanksgiving Day and New Year’s Day.  According to John 10:22-23 , Yeshua and his disciples were amongst the many who celebrated the yearly, eight day festival.

Other Names
The Hebrew word Chanukah [חֲנֻכָּה – H2598] means: dedication, or consecration.  It comes from the root word, chanak [חָנַךְ –H2596].  In Greek, the word is egkainia [ἐγκαίνια – G1456]. Chanukah is also called:
• The Feast of Dedication
• The Festival of Lights

Historical Background
Chanukah is the festival that Jews celebrate to commemorate the rededication of the Temple during the time of the Maccabees, and centers around the lighting of the candles on the menorah. Chanukah was instituted by Judah Maccabaeus in 164 BC in memory of the cleansing of the temple from the pollution of Antiochus IV, also known as Antiochus Epiphanes.  Antiochus was one of the four successors of Alexander the Great.

Antiochus IV oppressed the Jews severely, placed a Hellenistic priest in the Temple, massacred many Jews, prohibited them from practicing circumcision and other rites, and desecrated the Temple by sacrificing pigs on the altar (Daniel and Yeshua reference this as the Abomination That Causes Desolation – Daniel chapters 11 and 12, Matthew 24:15, and Mark 13:14).  Mattathias the Hasmonean and his son Judah Maccabaeus joined forces and were able to retake the temple.  Upon doing so, they found only enough oil to keep the menorah lit for one day but miraculously it burned for eight days, the time needed to prepare a fresh supply of oil for the menorah. Chanukah celebrates this miracle.

The entire story of the abomination that causes desolation and the retaking and cleansing of the temple can be found in the Apocrypha in Books 1-4 Maccabees.

Modern Background
Each year, Jews light the candles on a nine branched Menorah [hanukkiah – חַנֻכִּיָּה‎].  The first candle to be lit is the center candle, known as the shamash [שמש‎] which means: attendant, or servant.  All the other candles are placed in the menorah and lit from this center candle.  The candles are progressively inserted into the menorah, starting from the right and ending with the far left candle, but are lit on successive nights from left to right as one honors the newer thing first.

Christian Background
Yeshua is the light that has come into the world (John 8:12, 9:5, 12:46, etc).  Christians are the temple of the living word – believers in Him are a temple for Him, and He dwells in them. Like the Menorah in the stone Temple, Yeshua is the light in our temple of flesh.  Yeshua is THE servant candle!

Chanukah Lessons
•  Everyone has a purpose – one is not to fail to stand up for Yahweh, his people, or, in this case, his Temple.
•  Yahweh answers prayer – He is in control.  Yahweh has covenanted with the Jewish people to be their God.  He will not allow another to take his place, no matter how hard they try.
•  Be faithful to Yahweh in all you do – Bowing only to Yahweh may land you in trouble, but Yahweh is more than able to overcome any obstacles you face, even against principalities, powers, rulers, and the spiritually wicked in high places (Ephesians 6:12).
•  Yahweh can turn mourning into joy – The Temple was retaken and rededicated.

Interesting Correlations
Luke 21:25 – “There will be signs in sun and moon and stars . . .”
According to some calculations it is possible that Yeshua was conceived on Chanukah, though I do not agree with this theory.  We all walk in darkness and need a miracle to uphold the light within.  Only Yeshua can do so.

In 2013 Chanukah and Thanksgiving were celebrated on the same day, the last time this will happen for the next 75,000 years, according to Mark Biltz of El Shaddai Ministries. Also this year, Comet Ison, officially known as comet C/2012 S1 graced our skies, swooping quite close to the Sun on November 28th, which “coincidentally” fell on the first day of Chanukkah that year! Perhaps Yahweh lit his Chanukah candle in our heavens to signal the imminent return of Yeshua.

Related Links
Jewish FAQ Chanukah Article
IFCJ Chanukah Article
El Shaddai Chanukah Article
Hebrew4Christians Chanukah Article

The Moedim

Tish’a B’Av

Zechariah 7:13 – “Therefore it is come to pass, that as he cried, and they would not hear; so they cried, and I would not hear, saith the LORD of hosts . . .”

According to history, many events considered disastrous by the Jews have occurred on Tish’a B’Av, also called the Ninth of Av, the saddest day in Jewish history.

Tisha B’Av is the culmination of a three-week period of increasing mourning that begins with the Fast of the 17th of Tammuz. During this three-week period, the Scroll of Lamentations is read and prayers are recited during the evening services, and the Torah Scroll cabinet (Ark) is covered by black cloth. In some synagogues the Scroll of Job is read on the morning of Tisha B’Av.

Tisha B’Av primarily commemorates the destruction of the first and second Temples, both of which were destroyed on the ninth of Av. the first Temple was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C. and the second Temple by the Romans in 70 A.D.

Weddings, other celebrations, and cutting the hair are not permitted.  From the first to the ninth of Av, most people also refrain from eating meat or drinking wine and from wearing new clothing. These restrictions are very similar to the restrictions observed during Yom Kippur. They are:
• No eating or drinking
• No washing or bathing
• No application of creams or oils
• No wearing of (leather) shoes
• No marital relations

The First Occurrence
• Av 9, 1312 BC – Only two of the twelve spies sent by Moses to observe the land of Canaan, Joshua and Caleb, returned with a positive report.  The ten spy report caused the Hebrews to cry, panic, and despair of ever entering their Promised Land.  For this, they were punished and Yahweh decreed that their generation would not enter the land and for all future generations this date would become one of crying and misfortune for their descendants, the Jewish people. (Numbers 13:25-14:12, Zechariah 7:3-5, 8:19).

First and Second Temple Destructions
• Av 9, 421 BC – The First Temple built by King Solomon was destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar and the Judeans were sent into the Babylonian exile. About 100,000 Jews killed during invasion. Exile of remaining tribes in southern kingdom to Babylon and Persia.
• Av 9, 70 AD – The Second Temple built by Ezra and Nehemiah was destroyed by the Romans on August 4, 70 AD. Over 2,500,000 Jews die as a result of war, famine and disease. Over 1,000,000 Jews exiled to all parts of the Roman Empire.  Over 100,000 Jews were sold as slaves by Romans or were killed and tortured in gladiatorial “games” and pagan celebrations.

Subsequent Happenings
• Av 9, 71 AD – The Roman army plowed Jerusalem with salt on July 25, 71 AD.
• Av 9, 132 AD – The Romans crushed Bar Kokhba’s revolt and destroyed the city of Betar, killing over 100,000 Jews, on July 8, 132.
• Av 9, 133 AD – Turnus Rufus ploughs the site of the Temple. The Romans build the pagan city of Aelia Capitolina on the site of Jerusalem.
• Av 9, 135 AD – The destruction of Simeon Bar Kokhba’s army on August 5, 135 AD.
• Av 9, 1095 AD – The First Crusade was declared by Pope Urban II on July 20, 1095. The Crusades bring death and destruction to thousands of Jews, totally obliterating many communities in Rhineland and France.
• Av 9, 1190 AD – 500 Jews died as a result of the rich storming a castle in York England on July 14, 1190.
• Av 9, 1290 AD – July 25, 1290 – Jews forced out of England accompanied by pogroms and confiscation of books and property.
• Av 9, 1290 AD – July 21, 1306 – The Jews were expelled from France, again accompanied by pogroms and confiscation of books and property.
• Av 9, 1492 AD – August 11, 1492 – The Inquisition in Spain and Portugal culminates in the expulsion of the Jews from the Iberian Peninsula. Families are separated, many die by drowning, and there is massive loss of property by all.
• Av 9, 1648 AD – On July 18, 1648 Bohdan Zenobi Chmielnicki, the leader of the The Cossacks, a military class of Ukranian-southern Russians, began the massacre of tens of thousands of Polish Jews. This massacre continued 1651.
• Av 9, 1914 AD World War I begins on August 1, 1914. Russia also launches persecutions against the Jews in Eastern Russia on this same day. There were over 400 pogroms immediately following World War I in Hungary, Ukraine, Poland, and Russia.
• Av 9, 1929 AD – Mufti Hajj Amin Al Hussein stirs up riots against Jews at the Wailing Wall, Hebron Massacre ensues.
• Av 9, 1941 AD – On August 2, 1941 SS commander Heinrich Himmler formally received approval from the Nazi Party for “The Final Solution”.
• Av 9, 1942 AD – The mass deportation began of Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto, en route to the Treblinka Concentration Camp, began on the eve of July 23, 1942.
• Av 9, 1989 AD – On August 10, 1989 The Iraqis walked out of the talks with Kuwait, then invaded Kuwait and set fires to the oil wells. This action finally lead to the Gulf War in 1992.
• Av 9, 1994 AD – The Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, Argentina, was bombed killing 86 and wounding 300 others on Monday July 18, 1994. On that same day the twenty-one pieces of Shoemaker-Levi Comet began bombarding the Planet Jupiter!
• Av 9, 2005 AD – Starting at midnight on August 14, 2005, the entry and presence of Israeli citizens in the Gaza Strip is prohibited.
• Av 9, 2006 AD The Lebanon War breaks out. On August 3, 2006, the Vatican sponsored “Rome Peace Conference” put the finishing touches on the “Rome Peace Accord”. This agreement halted the Israeli defensive thrust into Lebanon, and a Hezbollah commando force to abducted two Israeli soldiers.
• Av 9, 2012 AD – The 2012 Olympics were inaugurated in London, England on the evening of July 27, 2012. This date marked the 40th anniversary of the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, during which eight Palestinian terrorists infiltrated the Munich Olympic village and killed eleven members of the Israel Olympic team.
• Av 9, 2014 AD – On August 5, 2014, Israel commemorated past and present tragedies, especially the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem and the subsequent exile of the Jews from the Land of Israel.
Av 9, 2015 AD – On July 25th, 2015 the Statue to Satan (Baphomet) was unveiled by the Satanic Temple in Detroit.

Conclusions
Yahweh declared that Tish’a B’Av would be a day of mourning and misfortune.   To see these occurrences as simply coincidence would deny His word. Let us pray that Av 9th this year is not yet another day of disaster for our Jewish brothers.

Related Links
OHR Tish’a B’Av Article
JewFaq Tish’a B’Av Article
Jewsih Source Tish’a B’Av Article
About Judaism Tish’a B’Av Article

The Moedim

Chag Ha’Matzoth

Meeting Times [מוֹעֵד H4150] – (Seasons)
The sun, moon, and stars indicate set appointments when Yahweh will show up to interact with His people. The Older Covenant feasts, Yahweh’s meeting times (seasons), are determined by the cycles of the moon. The word translated feasts is the Hebrew word, מוֹעֵד Moed. Moed means a divine appointment. In other words: a fixed time or season, specifically a festival.

Moed [מוֹעֵד H4150]
• At this set time – Genesis 17:21, 21:2; Exodus 9:5
• At the appointed time – Genesis 18:14
• An appointed season – Exodus 13:10; Numbers 9:2, 9:3, 9:7, 9:13; Deuteronomy 16:6
• An appointed place (tabernacle / tent of the congregation) – Numerous Exodus, Leviticus passages.

In Greek: Chronos [χρόνος G5550] — time either long or short – time.
Kairos [καιρός G2540] – a fixed and definite time – season.

It is not for you to know the timesG5550 or the season G2540 . . .” – Acts 1:7
But of the times and the seasons . . .” – 1 Thessalonians 5:1

The Moedim were times when Yahweh appointed a מִקְרָא Miqrao. A miqrao is something called out. In other words: a public meeting, an assembly, a holy convocation, a reading, or a rehearsal. In other words, the feasts are a dress rehearsal for the coming of Yeshua. The moedim of Israel have a practical, a symbolic, and a prophetic application.

Miqrao [מִקְרָא H4744]
• A holy convocation – Exodus 12:16; Leviticus 23:2-8; Numbers 28:18, 28:25, 29:12
• An assembly – Numbers 10:2; Isaiah 1:13, 4:5
• A reading – Nehemiah 8:8

The Three Commanded Moedim
Deuteronomy 16:16 – “Three times in a year all your males shall appear before the LORD your God in the place which He chooses, at the Feast of Unleavened Bread and at the Feast of Weeks and at the Feast of Booths, and they shall not appear before the LORD empty-handed.

The Three commanded Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover), including Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread) and Reishit Katzir (First Fruits)
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Seven Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover)
• Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread)
• Reishit Katzir (First Fruits) Begins on the third day after Pesach.
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Yom Teruah (Trumpets)
• Yom Kippurim (Day of Atonements)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Second Holy Day
Exodus 12:17 – “You shall also observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread, for on this very day I brought your hosts out of the land of Egypt; therefore you shall observe this day throughout your generations as a permanent ordinance.”
Exodus 13:7 – “Unleavened bread shall be eaten for seven days; no leavened bread shall be seen with you, and no leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory.”
Deuteronomy 16:4 – “No leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory for seven days, nor shall any of the flesh that you sacrifice on the evening of the first day remain all night until morning.”
Exodus 34:18 – “You shall observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread. For seven days you are to eat unleavened bread,  as I commanded you, at the appointed time in the month of Abib, for in the month of Abib you came out of Egypt.

The second holy day is called Chag Ha’Matzoth, or the Festival of The Unleavened Bread.  According to the book of Exodus, the Israelis hastily departed from the tyranny of Egyptian ruler Ramses II and they could not wait for bread to be leavened and rise.  So to observe the festive occasion, bread baked without yeast was eaten during the seven days of the feast.  The unleavened bread eaten during Passover festival is also known by the name matzoh.

Historical Background
During the period preceding Pesach and Chag Ha’Matzoth the Jews would entirely cleanse their homes of any trace of leaven, called chametz.  This cleansing would include the removal of any bread products that had been made with leaven.  The feast symbolizes their inability to cook leavened bread as they made their exodus from Egypt.

The earliest celebrations show a distinct observance of Pesach on the 14th day of Nisan, followed the next day by the observance of Chag Ha’Matzoth on the 15th thru the 21st.  While not so clearly described as separate celebrations in the Bible, the Book of Jubilees clearly indicates that these were separate events.  Jubilees 49:22 puts it this way: “And you, Moses, command the children of Israel so that they shall keep the ordinance of the Passover just as it was commanded to you so that you might relate to them its annual (occurrence) each year, both its period of days and the feast of unleavened bread . . .”

The feasts of Pesach and Chag Ha’Matzoth were only observed three times until they entered the Promised Land, and then again, only three times between entering the Promised Land and the Babylonian captivity.  It was only after the return of the Jews from Babylon that the feasts were more regularly observed.

Modern Background
Jews today continue to observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread, called Chag Ha’Matzoth in the Hebrew tongue.  All forms of leaven are cleansed from their homes.  During the Passover Seder meal, three matzos are used.  There has been much debate about who or what the three Matzos represent.  Some Rabbis say they represent the Kohens or Priests, the Levites, and the Israelites.  Others say they represent Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The middle matzo, therefore, would correspond to Isaac, the miraculously born son of Abraham, who was taken to what would become the Temple Mount to be offered as a sacrifice! (Genesis 18:13-14, 21:1-2, 22:1-18 and 2 Chronicles 3:1).  But we know that they represent El Elyon B The Father Almighty God, Yeshua Ben Elohim B the Son of God, and the Ruach Ha’Kodesh B the Holy Spirit of God.  The middle matzo is called the Afikoman.

The Afikoman
The Greek meaning of the word Afikoman can be understood as “that which is coming”
• In the Passover Seder meal the middle matzo is taken and broken in two. This is the portion that Yeshua broke during the Last Supper when He said, “This is my body that is broken for you”.
• One half of the broken Matzo is wrapped in a white cloth and hidden, to be found later in the meal, so that the children will stay awake. This portion is called the Afikoman. We remember that Jesus three times asked his disciples to “stay awake” (Matthew 26:36-46).
• The middle person of the Godhead was broken for us at Passover, and we remember that hiding the middle matzo is a picture of His burial.
• Later in the meal, when the children find the Afikoman, we remember that Jesus is risen, no longer hidden in the belly of the earth.
The Jews have been taking the middle matzo, the Afikoman, not understanding that the Matzo that is broken, wrapped in a cloth, buried, and found is symbolic of Yeshua their Messiah.

Prophetic Fulfillment
Chag Ha’Matzoth declares that Yahweh’s people are to be set apart from sin, just as Yeshua was sinless.

Date Of Moed: 15th Day of 1st Month
Key Word: Holiness
Prophetic Fulfillment: This moed was fulfilled in Yeshua’s Burial on the day after Pesach, just as the Feast of Chag Ha’Matzoth began..
Key Scriptures:
1 Peter 1:15‑16 – “Instead, as he who called you is holy, be holy yourselves in all your conduct; for it is written, ‘You shall be holy, for I am holy’.”
1 Corinthians 5:7-8 – “Purge out therefore the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, as you are unleavened. For even Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us: Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven . . . but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

Conclusion
There is a pattern of dress rehearsals that are represented by the Moedim of Yahweh. This Moed, Chag Ha’Matzoth  (Feast of Unleavened Bread), was fulfilled in Yeshua’s burial just as the Feast of Chag Ha’Matzoth began on the day after Pesach. The nation of Israel and the Jews have been celebrating Chag Ha’Matzoth  for almost three thousand years, understanding that it symbolizes their inability to cook leavened bread as they made their exodus from Egypt, but failing to understand its greater symbolism that Yeshua their Mashiach has been broken, wrapped in a cloth, buried, and has risen to everlasting life.

Related Links
Hebrew For Christians Article
Bible Truth Article
The Torah Article
AngelFire Article
End Time Pilgrim Article
CBN Article

The Moedim

Sukkoth

Meeting Times [מוֹעֵד H4150] – (Seasons)
The sun, moon, and stars indicate set appointments when Yahweh will show up to interact with His people. The Older Covenant feasts, Yahweh’s meeting times (seasons), are determined by the cycles of the moon. The word translated feasts is the Hebrew word, מוֹעֵד Moed. Moed means a divine appointment. In other words: a fixed time or season, specifically a festival.

Moed [מוֹעֵד H4150]
• At this set time – Genesis 17:21, 21:2; Exodus 9:5
• At the appointed time – Genesis 18:14
• An appointed season – Exodus 13:10; Numbers 9:2, 9:3, 9:7, 9:13; Deuteronomy 16:6
• An appointed place (tabernacle / tent of the congregation) – Numerous Exodus, Leviticus passages.

In Greek: Chronos [χρόνος G5550] — time either long or short – time.
Kairos [καιρός G2540] – a fixed and definite time – season.

It is not for you to know the timesG5550 or the season G2540 . . .” – Acts 1:7
But of the times and the seasons . . .” – 1 Thessalonians 5:1

The Moedim were times when Yahweh appointed a מִקְרָא Miqrao. A miqrao is something called out. In other words: a public meeting, an assembly, a holy convocation, a reading, or a rehearsal. In other words, the feasts are a dress rehearsal for the coming of Yeshua. The moedim of Israel have a practical, a symbolic, and a prophetic application.

Miqrao [מִקְרָא H4744]
• A holy convocation – Exodus 12:16; Leviticus 23:2-8; Numbers 28:18, 28:25, 29:12
• An assembly – Numbers 10:2; Isaiah 1:13, 4:5
• A reading – Nehemiah 8:8

The Three Commanded Moedim
Deuteronomy 16:16 – “Three times in a year all your males shall appear before the LORD your God in the place which He chooses, at the Feast of Unleavened Bread and at the Feast of Weeks and at the Feast of Booths, and they shall not appear before the LORD empty-handed.

The Three commanded Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover), including Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread) and Reishit Katzir (First Fruits)
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Seven Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover)
• Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread)
• Reishit Katzir (First Fruits) Begins on the third day after Pesach.
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Yom Teruah (Trumpets)
• Yom Kippurim (Day of Atonements)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Seventh Holy Day
Leviticus 23:34 – “Give the following instructions to the people of Israel. Begin celebrating Sukkoth on the fifteenth day of the appointed month.. This festival to Yahweh will last for seven days.”

Leviticus 23:42 – “You will dwell in a sukkah for seven days; all natives of Israel will dwell in a sukkah.”

The Feast of Tabernacles official Hebrew name is Sukkoth [סוכות‎ H5521].  Sukkoth means: booths. An individual booth is called sukkah. Sukkoth is the seventh and final feast commanded by Yahweh to be celebrated, and is also the third and final feast of the fall feasts.  Sukkoth is the third feast that all Jewish males are required to attend.  The three feasts are: Pesach (Passover) , Shavuot (Pentecost), and Sukkoth (Tabernacles).

Key Word:. Eternal Life
Date Of Moed: 15th Day of 7th Month

Historical Background
The Festival of Sukkoth began on Tishri 15, – five days after the Day of Atonements or Yom Kippurim, and lasted for seven days. Like Pesach (Passover) and Shavuot (Pentecost), Sukkoth had both a historical and an agricultural component.  Historically, it was a memorial of the forty year period during which the Hebrew people wandered in the desert while living in temporary shelters.  Agriculturally, it was a harvest festival, referred to as Chag Ha-Asif, the Festival of Ingathering, celebrating the day of ingathering of fruit and vine crops.  No work was permitted on the first and second days of the holiday.  Sukkoth was quite a drastic transition from one of the most solemn holidays in the year (Yom Kippurim) to one of the most joyous.

The Joy
Of the three harvest festivals Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkoth, Sukkoth is the most joyous and is still well known as the “Season of our Rejoicing”.  Pesach corresponds to the planting season, Shavuot to the grain harvest, and Sukkoth to the fruit harvest.  While much joy was expressed upon the first gathering of the wheat, it is not until the culmination of the summer that all of the crops are harvested.  It is at this time that the fullness of the harvest is realized, and one gives thanksgiving to Yahweh for His sustenance throughout the rest of the year.

The Four Species
Leviticus 23:40 – “On the first day, you will take for yourselves a fruit of a beautiful tree, palm branches, twigs of a braided tree and brook willows, and you will rejoice before Yahweh for seven days.”

The Four Species are a lemon-like fruit (etrog); a palm branch (kapot temarim); two willow branches (aravot); and three myrtle branches (haddasim).  The three types of branches collectively are called the lulav.  The Four Species are believed to represent either different parts of the body, or different kinds of Jews.

When representing the different parts of the body, they are:
• The Palm Branch . . . . . . . . . The Spine
• The Myrtle Leaf . . . . . . . . . . The Eye
• The Willow Leaf . . . . . . . . .  The Mouth
• The Lemon-Like Fruit . . . . .  The Heart

When representing the different kinds of Jews, they are:
• The Palm Branch . . . . . . . . . Jews who have knowledge of Torah but are lacking in mitzvot
• The Myrtle Leaf . . . . . . . . . . Jews who perform mitzvot but have little knowledge of Torah
• The Willow Leaf . . . . . . . . .  Jews who have no knowledge of Torah and do not perform the mitzvot
• The Lemon-Like Fruit . . . . .  Jews who have achieved both knowledge of Torah and performance of mitzvot

The Four Species are brought together during Sukkoth as a reminder that every one of these four kinds is important, and that all must be united for a body to properly function.

The four species were held and waved during processions around the altar in the Temple in Jerusalem.  The branches are held in the right hand, and the lemon-like fruit in the left hand.  They are waived three times to the east, south, west, and north, then upwards and downwards (front, right, back, left, up, down) to symbolize the omnipresence of Yahweh.  On the seventh day of Sukkoth, seven circuits were made around the altar. Afterward, the willow branches are stuck against the floor five times, symbolizing Yahweh’s providential giving of the fall rains.

Modern Background
John 14:3 – “I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be.

The Festival of Sukkoth still begins on Tishri 15, – five days after the Day of Atonements or Yom Kippurim, and also lasts for seven days.  Prior to the feast, Jewish celebrants build a temporary shelter alongside their home in honor of the temporary homes used by their ancestors in the wilderness.  All meals are eaten in the sukkah (booth), and the entire family sleeps inside the sukkah as well, except during inclement weather or due to health problems.

Building the sukkah each year is great fun for the children and they treat it the same as building a fort and then camping out in it in the backyard.  It is common for a sukkah to be decorated.  In the United States, items such as dried squash and corn may hang from the “rafters” and walls.  This Jewish tradition, in some ways,  mirrors the decorating of a Christmas tree and is a fun, family project.  The Thanksgiving Holiday, first celebrated by the Pilgrims, is based in part on Sukkoth.

The Four Species are still gathered and waved, but today the procession circles around the Aron Kodesh or Ark which is the closet in which the Torah (Older Covenant) scroll is stored in the Synagogue.

Zechariah 14:16-19And it will come to pass, that every nation shall go up from year to year to worship Yeshua and to keep the Feast Of Sukkoth, and those who do not will receive no rain.

At the end of the tribulation period, all of the Jews worldwide will be gathered together and resettled in Israel, and Jerusalem will be their capital.  Yeshua will take His place on the Throne of David, and will begin His millennial reign.  At that time, all the nations of the world will also gather in Jerusalem to celebrate Sukkoth with the Jews each year.  Any nation that does not attend, will be punished with drought in their land.

Conclusion
Sukkoth celebrates both the forty year period during which the Hebrew people wandered in the desert while living in temporary shelters and the day of ingathering of fruit and vine crops.  Sukkoth is one of the most joyous celebrations  and is well known as the “Season of our Rejoicing.”  Sukkoth today celebrates a return to Jerusalem to celebrate Sabbath and will find its final fulfillment when Yeshua returns to Earth, gathers all nations together, and sets up His Millennial Reign, a temporary period of one thousand years before eternity begins.

The Moedim

Yom Kippurim

Meeting Times [מוֹעֵד H4150] – (Seasons)
The sun, moon, and stars indicate set appointments when Yahweh will show up to interact with His people. The Older Covenant feasts, Yahweh’s meeting times (seasons), are determined by the cycles of the moon. The word translated feasts is the Hebrew word, מוֹעֵד Moed. Moed means a divine appointment. In other words: a fixed time or season, specifically a festival.

Moed [מוֹעֵד H4150]
• At this set time – Genesis 17:21, 21:2; Exodus 9:5
• At the appointed time – Genesis 18:14
• An appointed season – Exodus 13:10; Numbers 9:2, 9:3, 9:7, 9:13; Deuteronomy 16:6
• An appointed place (tabernacle / tent of the congregation) – Numerous Exodus, Leviticus passages.

In Greek: Chronos [χρόνος G5550] — time either long or short – time.
Kairos [καιρός G2540] – a fixed and definite time – season.

It is not for you to know the timesG5550 or the season G2540 . . .” – Acts 1:7
But of the times and the seasons . . .” – 1 Thessalonians 5:1

The Moedim were times when Yahweh appointed a מִקְרָא Miqrao. A miqrao is something called out. In other words: a public meeting, an assembly, a holy convocation, a reading, or a rehearsal. In other words, the feasts are a dress rehearsal for the coming of Yeshua. The moedim of Israel have a practical, a symbolic, and a prophetic application.

Miqrao [מִקְרָא H4744]
• A holy convocation – Exodus 12:16; Leviticus 23:2-8; Numbers 28:18, 28:25, 29:12
• An assembly – Numbers 10:2; Isaiah 1:13, 4:5
• A reading – Nehemiah 8:8

The Three Commanded Moedim
Deuteronomy 16:16 – “Three times in a year all your males shall appear before the LORD your God in the place which He chooses, at the Feast of Unleavened Bread and at the Feast of Weeks and at the Feast of Booths, and they shall not appear before the LORD empty-handed.

The Three commanded Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover), including Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread) and Reishit Katzir (First Fruits)
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Seven Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover)
• Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread)
• Reishit Katzir (First Fruits) Begins on the third day after Pesach.
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Yom Teruah (Trumpets)
• Yom Kippurim (Day of Atonements)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Sixth Holy Day
Leviticus 16:29-30 – “This shall be a permanent statute for you: in the seventh month, on the tenth day of the month, you shall humble your souls and not do any work, whether the native, or the alien who sojourns among you;  for it is on this day that atonement shall be made for you to cleanse you; you will be clean from all your sins.”

The Day of Atonements official Hebrew name is Yom Kippurim (יוֹם כִּפֻּר).  The word Yom (יוֹם H3117) simply means: day.  The word Kippur [כִּפֻּר H3725] means atonement, and kippurim means atonements.  Yom Kippurim atones only for sins between man and Yahweh, not for sins against another person.  To atone for sins against another person, you must first seek reconciliation with that person, righting the wrongs you committed against them if possible. That must all be done during the ten days between Yom Teruah (Rosh Hashanah) and Yom Kippurim, a period called the Days of Awe.

Key Word: Justification
Date Of  Moed: 10th Day of 7th Month.

Historical Background
Yom Kippurim is the feast celebrating the day when each person’s sins of the year were covered until payment could be made to fully remove the sins.  The day, however, includes much more than one single atonement. The High Priest (Kohen Gadol) would make atonement for the holy sanctuary, for the Tabernacle, and for the altar. He would also make atonement for the priests and for all the people (Leviticus 16:33).  Hence, Day of Atonements — Yom Kippurim.

According to Jewish tradition, on Yom Teruah Yahweh writes each person’s fate for the coming year in the Book of Life, but waits until the end of Yom Kippurim to seal the book with its verdicts. Three actions taken during the ten Days of Awe are believed to change these verdicts: repentance (teshuvah תשובה), prayer (tefillah תְּפִלָּה), and good deeds (tzedakah צדקה‎).  A person is expected to amend his or her behavior and ask forgiveness for sins committed against Yahweh and against others.  During the evening and day of Yom Kippurim both public and private petitions and confessions of guilt are made. At the end of Yom Kippurim, one expects that Yahweh has forgiven their sins and has declared them a righteous one (tzaddik צַדִּיק).

Yom Kippurim is said to be the Sabbath of Sabbaths and is observed by a twenty-five hour fast that begins prior to sunset on the evening before Yom Kippurim and ends shortly after nightfall on the day of Yom Kippurim.   No work is to be done during this time, and the fast is to be complete – no food, no beverage, not even any water.  The fast is also to include abstention from:
•  bathing or showering
•  washing of any kind (except for hand-washing after visiting the restroom)
•  applying perfumes, scented oils, lotion, deodorant, or cosmetics
•  wearing leather shoes (a sign of luxury)
•  marital sexual relations

During the twenty-five hour observance of Yom Kippurim there are five services:
•  Kol Nidrei  –  An evening service that marks the beginning of Yom Kippurim
•  Shacharit    –  An early morning service with six Torah readings
•  Musaf         –  A second morning service with a Torah reading of the Day of  Atonements scriptures
•  Mincha       –  An afternoon service with Torah reading (Leviticus 18) and a reading of the entire Book of Jonah
•  Neilah         –  A final service that marks the ending of Yom Kippurim

Modern Background
Hebrews 9:24-28 – “For Yeshua has not entered into the holy place made with human hands, (a mere copy of the Heavenly Most Holy Place). He has entered into Heaven itself, now to appear before Yahweh for us. Nor did he enter into Heaven to offer himself again and again, the way the Cohen Ha’Gadol (High Priest) enters the Most Holy Place every year with blood that is not his own. Otherwise Yeshua would have had to suffer many times since the creation of the world. But He has appeared once for all at the culmination of the ages to do away with sin by the sacrifice of himself. And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment, so Yeshua was once offered to bear the sins of many; and will appear a second time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for Him.”

The Yom Kippurim feast sacrifices parallel the work of Yeshua Ha’Mashiach as our Kohen Gadol, or High Priest, who is of the order of Malki-Tzedek.  Under the Older Covenant, the High Priest could only enter the Holy of Holies one day of the year, on Yom Kippurim .  Under the Newer Covenant, Yeshua entered the Holy of Holies in the Heavenly Temple, cleansed the altar with His blood, made atonement for all sin, and now sits at the right hand of Yahweh.

Under the Older Covenant, our sins were merely covered for only one year at a time.  Under the Newer Covenant, Yom Kippurim marks the day when all of our sins were fully taken away through the sacrifice of Yeshua on the cross.  Guilt and condemnation were fully removed.  The payment for our sins was paid in full by His shed blood.  A yearly sacrifice is no longer necessary.

Conclusion
The Feast of Yom Kippurim symbolizes the final writing of the verdict that each person listed in the Book of Life is a righteous one, a tzaddik צַדִּיק.   Atonements for the holy sanctuary, for the Tabernacle, for the altar, for the priests, and for all the people has been made.  The payment for all sin has been paid in full by the shed blood of Yeshua Ha’Mashiach.

The Moedim

Yom Teruah

Meeting Times [מוֹעֵד H4150] – (Seasons)
The sun, moon, and stars indicate set appointments when Yahweh will show up to interact with His people. The Older Covenant feasts, Yahweh’s meeting times (seasons), are determined by the cycles of the moon. The word translated feasts is the Hebrew word, מוֹעֵד Moed. Moed means a divine appointment. In other words: a fixed time or season, specifically a festival.

Moed [מוֹעֵד H4150]
• At this set time – Genesis 17:21, 21:2; Exodus 9:5
• At the appointed time – Genesis 18:14
• An appointed season – Exodus 13:10; Numbers 9:2, 9:3, 9:7, 9:13; Deuteronomy 16:6
• An appointed place (tabernacle / tent of the congregation) – Numerous Exodus, Leviticus passages.

In Greek: Chronos [χρόνος G5550] — time either long or short – time.
Kairos [καιρός G2540] – a fixed and definite time – season.

It is not for you to know the timesG5550 or the season G2540 . . .” – Acts 1:7
But of the times and the seasons . . .” – 1 Thessalonians 5:1

The Moedim were times when Yahweh appointed a מִקְרָא Miqrao. A miqrao is something called out. In other words: a public meeting, an assembly, a holy convocation, a reading, or a rehearsal. In other words, the feasts are a dress rehearsal for the coming of Yeshua. The moedim of Israel have a practical, a symbolic, and a prophetic application.

Miqrao [מִקְרָא H4744]
• A holy convocation – Exodus 12:16; Leviticus 23:2-8; Numbers 28:18, 28:25, 29:12
• An assembly – Numbers 10:2; Isaiah 1:13, 4:5
• A reading – Nehemiah 8:8

The Seven Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover)
• Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread)
• Reishit Katzir (First Fruits) Begins on the third day after Pesach.
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Yom Teruah (Trumpets)
• Yom Kippurim (Day of Atonements)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Three Commanded Moedim
Deuteronomy 16:16 – “Three times in a year all your males shall appear before the LORD your God in the place which He chooses, at the Feast of Unleavened Bread and at the Feast of Weeks and at the Feast of Booths, and they shall not appear before the LORD empty-handed.

The Three commanded Moedim are:
• Pesach (Passover), including Chag Ha’Matzoth (Unleavened Bread) and Reishit Katzir (First Fruits)
• Shavuot (Pentecost)
• Sukkoth (Tabernacles)

The Fifth Holy Day
Yom Teruah is commonly called Rosh Hashanah.  Today we are one day closer to the return of Yeshua than we were yesterday. Tomorrow we will be even one day closer. It is my prayer that this year finds Yom Teruah’s prophetic fulfillment in Yeshua’s return for his bride.

The Meaning of the Celebration
Yom Teruah celebrates the Resurrection of the Righteous, Kingship of the Lord, and Marriage of the Lamb. Only when two witnesses see the edge of the moon, can the festival start. They had a two day period in which they knew it would happen, but not the exact day or time. Hence, the expression Yeshua used: “You do not know the day or the hour” (Matthew 24:36). By using this expression, Yeshua also references the Kiddushin / Nesu’im, and the Yom HaKeseh. This day is a day of blessing, or as Paul puts it in Tutus 2:13 – “Our blessed hope”. Peter says the same in 1 Peter 1:13.

Yom Teruah and The Rapture
Psalm 89:15 – “Happy are those who hear the blessed sound of the Shofar, the joyful call to worship, for they will walk in the light of the presence of Yahweh.”

Yom Teruah (יוֹם תְּרוּעָה) is the official Hebrew name of the Moed, or Divine Appointment. Yom Teruah is also called Rosh Hashanah, The Feast Of Trumpets, The Feast Of Blowing, The Feast Of Repentance, or the Feast Of The New Moon.  The word Teruah (תְּרוּעָה H8643) means: a shout or blast of war, alarm, or joy; a loud noise of rejoicing; the voice of a trumpet.  Teruah is most frequently linked in scripture to the blowing of the Shofar and secondly as the noise of a joyful shouting.  The word Yom (יוֹם H3117) simply means: day.

Other Names for Rosh Hashanah include:
• Yom Teruah: Day of the Awakening Blast, or Day of the Sounding of the Shofar.
• Yom Ha’Din: The Day Of Judgment, The Day Of Opening The Books, The Opening Of The Gates.
• Yom Ha’Kiddushin / Nesu’im: The Wedding Day Of The Messiah.
• Yom Ha’Melekh: The Day Of The Coronation Of The Messiah.
• Yom Ha’Akedah: The Day Of Abraham’s Offering of Isaac.• Yom Ha’Natzal:
The Day Of The Resurrection of the Righteous Dead and the Taking Up of the Living Righteous.
• Yom Ha’Keseh: The Hidden Day, The Day of Hiding or Concealment.

Yom Teruah: Rosh Hashanah, The Feast Of Trumpets, The Day of the Sounding of the Shofar
Leviticus 23:24 – “Speak to the sons of Israel, saying, ‘In the seventh month on the first of the month you shall have a rest, a reminder by blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.”
Numbers 29:1 – “On the first day of the seventh month you shall have a holy convocation; you shall not work at your occupations. It is a day for you to blow the trumpets.”
Matthew 24:31 – “And He will send forth His angels with a great trumpet and they will gather together His elect from the four winds, from one end of the sky to the other.”

Yom Teruah, The Feast of Trumpets, is indelibly linked with the blowing of trumpets.  The Feast of Trumpets uses 100 distinct shofar (שׁוֹפָר H7782) blasts but only four different types of blasts during the festival.  They are the single Tekiah (תקיעה) blast which signify the sound of the King’s coronation, the three short Shevarim (שברים) blasts which signify repentance, the nine staccato Teruah (תרועה) blasts of alarm which signify the call to awaken the soul , and the great long Tekiah Ha’Gâdôl (גָּדוֹל –תקיעה) blast which signifies the voice of Yahweh.  The fourth and final type, the Tekiah Ha’Gâdôl, is known to the Jews as the “Last Trump” or as the “Trump of God”.

Yom Ha’Din: The Day of Judgment, The Day Of Opening The Books, the Opening of Heaven’s Gates
Psalm 33:15: – “He who fashions the hearts of all observes all their deeds.”
Revelation 20:11-12 – “Then I saw a great white throne and Him who sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away. And there was found no place for them. And I saw the dead, small and great, standing before God, and books were opened.”

This day brings together all those who are about to be judged, based on the fact that all have sinned, all have made mistakes. It is the day when all must pass before Yahweh to be judged for their actions of the last year, when the books are opened and He determines their fate for the next year. Rosh Hashanah is not a trial before a cruel or unknown judge on arbitrary charges, however, but a summing up of our deeds by a righteous judge who judges rightly.

On this day Rabbinical teachings tell us that three great books will be opened and that all men will be put into one of three classifications. The totally righteous are sealed and separated for life with God. This is called the natzel, or the rapture. The totally wicked are sealed to face the wrath of God during the tribulation period and then will be separated from God throughout all eternity. The fate of the people that are neither totally righteous nor totally wicked is not yet sealed at this point.

It is also a day of Repentance. Repentance, or Teshuva, consists of several steps in the Jewish tradition including recognition and admission of the wrong doing, and renunciation of the action. Teshuva also requires restitution to the wronged party and a promise not to repeat the offense. Those who are neither totally righteous nor totally wicked will have until Yom Kippur to repent. In other words, they would go through the tribulation period however unlike the totally wicked, many would repent and turn to God. Their fate is then determined after the seven year tribulation.  The trumpets declare the solemn warning that the gates of heaven are open and that the Court in Heaven is in session. 

Yom Ha’Kiddushin / Nesu’im: The Wedding Day Of The Messiah
Joel 2:15-16 – “Blow the trumpet in Zion, sanctify a fast, call a solemn assembly: Gather the people, sanctify the congregation, assemble the elders, gather the children, and those that suck the breasts: let the bridegroom go forth of his chamber, and the bride out of her closet.”

The Jewish wedding ceremony gives us another picture of Yom Teruah, including the escape theme in which God causes His people to escape wrath, and the concept of concealment behind a closed door. Only the father could determine the day and hour when the bridegroom would show up unannounced to take his bride home. Once the groom and betrothed were together, they proceeded to the groom’s new home, which was the same home as his father’s. Once back at the father’s home, the groom and bride then would be concealed in the Chuppah for seven days. Again, the image of a celebration that is hidden. This day is a day of the Wedding of the Bride of Yeshua, to their King.

Yom Ha’Melekh: The Day Of The Coronation Of The Messiah
Psalm 98:6 – “With trumpets and sound of cornet make a joyful noise before the LORD, the King.”

The blowing of the shofar on Yom Teruah also links this day to Yeshua’s sovereignty and Kingship over the world.  Judgment and Kingship are closely linked.  The coronation ceremony of Kings was ripe with the blowing of trumpets, noisy celebration, and a seven sealed document being opened and read to all in attendance. Because Yom Teruah is a coronation of Yahweh / Yeshua as king of the universe, one of the most famous and familiar prayers of this season is Avinu Malkenu (“Our Father, Our King”).

1 Kings 1:32-46 speaks of such a coronation, as does 2 Kings 11:12-13.  Psalm 47 is called the Coronation Psalm, and references the blowing of the shofar in celebration of His coming with a shout and the sound of the trumpet. Psalm 98 confirms that the shofar is blown to inform us that the King is praised and the fullness of the sea is present. Isaiah 12:1-6 puts the shouting in the context of the exaltation of His name being known throughout the earth. Isaiah 44:23-28 mentions shouting in relation to the Messianic era, as does Jeremiah 31:7 and Zephaniah 3:14-20Revelation 4 tells us that the Bride of Christ has been raptured, the King is on His throne, and the seven sealed scroll is opened.

These passages reference the coronation of the Messiah and its part in the celebration of Rosh Hashanah, albeit also in a somewhat hidden manner!  This day is a day of the Coronation of the King.

Yom Ha’Akedah: The Day Of Abraham’s Offering of Isaac, The Binding of Isaac
Genesis 22:7-8 – “Isaac spoke to Abraham his father and said, “My father!” And he said, “Here I am, my son.” And he said, “Behold, the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” Abraham said, “Yahweh will provide Himself the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.” So the two of them walked on together.”
Genesis 22:13 – “Then Abraham raised his eyes and looked, and behold, behind him a ram caught in the thicket by his horns; and Abraham went and took the ram and offered him up for a burnt offering in the place of his son.”

According to Jewish tradition, the Shofar is also blown on Yom Teruah as a reminder of the substitutional sacrifice of the lamb in place of the sacrificing of Isaac. Note that it is Yahweh himself who is the lamb! Genesis 22:8 could be translated: “Yahweh will provide Himself AS the lamb!”

The Ram’s left and right horns symbolize the Shofar’s First Trump and Shofar’s Last Trump. According to 1st Corinthians 15:52-54, Paul states that on this day, “in an instant, in the twinkling of an eye, at the sounding of the last shofar the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed from mortal to immortal.”  This day is a day of the Substitutional Sacrifice.

Yom Ha’Natzal: The Day Of The Resurrection of the Righteous Dead and the Taking Up of the Living Righteous
Daniel 12:2 – “Many of those who sleep in the dust of the ground will awake, these to everlasting life, but the others to disgrace and everlasting contempt.”
Isaiah 26:19 – “Your dead shall live, their corpses shall rise. You who lie in the dust, awake and shout for joy!”

In Exodus 19, when the trumpet was sounded, God came down and Moses went up! In 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17, the apostle Paul writes that “the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet of God . . .” Paul states that when the trumpet of God sounds, “those who have died believing in Christ will rise first. After that, we who are still alive will be gathered up with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And we will be with the Lord forever.

In 1 Corinthians15:51-52, Paul tells us: “Behold, I tell you a mystery; we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet; for the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed.” The last trumpet is referring to the Feast of Trumpets and reveals the day of the resurrection of the Saints and catching away or rapture.  This day is a day of blessing, or as Paul puts it in Titus 2:13, “Our blessed hope” – Peter says the same in 1 Peter 1:13.

Yom Ha’Keseh: The Hidden Day, The Day of Hiding, The Day of Concealment
Psalm 84:3 – “Blow the trumpet at the new moon, at the concealed time, on our feast day.”

Yom Ha’Keseh can be interpreted several different ways.  Firstly, it references the day when the moon is just coming out of hiding, in other words, a day of a concealed moon.  Secondly, Satan is not be given notice about the arrival of Rosh Hashanah, the Day of Judgment.  A hidden day because it was hidden from Satan, the adversary, in the same manner that the resurrection of Yeshua on the third day was hidden from his knowledge.

On Rosh Hashanah, Israel diminishes itself and conceals its greatness in awe of the Day of Judgment.  The Almighty, too, places a cover of concealment over His People’s sins and accords them forgiveness.  All that transpires on this day is characterized by concealment, and is applied in the individual’s behavior. Like a newborn with no past history in terms of relations to others, no resentment, grudges, or unhappiness, we are instructed to avoid anger, any expression of arrogance, or any negative thoughts, deeds, or words; the hope is that concealment of the negative will lead to its eradication, and to the cleansing of our souls.

Isaiah 26:20 speaks of a time when concealment or hiding is essential – during the time of wrath: “My people, go into your rooms and shut your doors behind you. Hide in your rooms for a short time until God’s anger is finished.”  Psalm 27:5 speaks of a similar hiding: “For in the day of trouble He will conceal me in His tabernacle; In the secret place of His tent He will hide me.”  Song of Songs 2:10-13 tells of the bride who has “come away” hidden in the secret places of the rock.  Chapter 6 confirms that she is hidden, unable to be found by those who seek her.  Her bridegroom, Yeshua, asks them “why do you look for the bride since she has been stolen by me?”    These passages reference Yom Teruah, albeit in a hidden manner!  This day is a day of concealment and protection from the wrath of Yahweh being poured out upon the unbelieving.

Conclusion
Yom Teruah’s three main themes are Resurrection of the Righteous, Kingship of the Lord, and Marriage of the Lamb, all rapture images.  There is a two day period in which they knew it would happen, but not the exact time. Only when two witnesses see the edge of the moon, can the festival start.  Hence, “You do not know the day or the hour.”  Yom Teruah is a day of hiding – a day whose importance is hidden from Satan and in which Yeshua’s Bride is also hidden.  Those who wait for the rapture expect to be hidden in Heaven during the tribulation period.  The blowing of the shofar easily portends the both a kingly coronation and a resurrection and rapture.

Combined, all these images present Yom Teruah as one of the premier representations of the Rapture event and therefore is one of the major candidates for the day of the Rapture.  No one, I repeat: NO ONE, can say on which Yom Teruah the Rapture will take place, however!  All we can do is stay alert and look forward to that day when our blessed hope is realized.  Yom Teruah is the day of the Blessed Hope.

Prophecy continues to unfold as foretold by the Hebrew prophets. The stage is being set. That being said, one can only ask: “How imminent is  the return of Yeshua Ha’Mashiach?”